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The Alliance Takes on the Wall Street Journal

You may have seen the recent Wall Street Journal article, “Posting Health Prices Online Isn’t Cure-All.” In it, the reporter takes a close look at New Hampshire’s twelve years of experience of posting prices online and concludes that there have been few benefits: prices have not significantly decreased, overall spending has been reduced only marginally, and few consumers use the site. Even though “New Hampshire has one of the most comprehensive and oldest hospital price-transparency laws in the U.S.,” the article suggests it’s a failed experiment.

While I agree that price transparency alone will not compel the change we need, I believe the article fell short on the most important ingredient of change. It’s not just how price transparency can change health care, but how transparency coupled with engaged multi-stakeholder support can propel action. As Leonardo da Vinci said, “Being willing is not enough. We must do.” When it comes to the Alliance, doing means bringing all of the different stakeholders together to inspire thoughtful conversations that lead to measurable improvements.

  • To help more than 15,000 employees access high quality health care, King County incorporated Alliance quality data in designing benefit plans and creating employee engagement programs, making it possible for them to make better health care decisions.
  • To better address the health care needs of its 18,000 home health caregivers, SEIU 775 learned from other Alliance members about ways to expand their behavioral health offerings, including launching a new mobile coaching app, video chats, screenings and online mindfulness classes, resulting in higher quality care.
  • The Everett Clinic used the Hospital Value report to identify areas that needed improvement and take action to make that possible.

These organizational choices have resulted in quality improvements for hundreds of thousands of people whose care is not only beating the Community Checkup’s statewide averages for care, but the HEDIS 10% national benchmarks.

We know that providing pricing and quality data is critical, but the key to change is the ability to bring all of the different and, sometimes, competing interests together towards the same goal. That is why we worked with the statewide Choosing Wisely Task Force to create the “Drop the Pre-Op” campaign to reduce the number of unnecessary preoperative lab tests on healthy people before low-risk procedures. In our last waste report, unnecessary pre-ops were responsible for an estimated $85.2 million in wasteful services impacting 122,257 individuals. Tremendous work remains ahead to eliminate these unnecessary tests in hospitals across our state and we stand ready to help in these efforts.

So yes, we agree with the Wall Street Journal that price transparency alone isn’t the answer. But, if we bring all of the stakeholders to the table and combine price transparency with quality measurement and waste reduction, and then put that information to work in purchasing, benefit design, changing practice patterns, and changing consumer behavior, that’s when we will drive changes in our health care system.

How do I know this? Because we already are.

I look forward to making more of that possible with you.

All the best,

Nancy Giunto

Published: August 1, 2019

About Washington Health Alliance

The Washington Health Alliance is a place where stakeholders work collaboratively to transform Washington state’s health care system for the better. The Alliance brings together organizations that share a commitment to drive change in our health care system by offering a forum for critical conversation and aligned efforts by stakeholders: purchasers, providers, health plans, consumers and other health care partners. The Alliance believes strongly in transparency and offers trusted and credible reporting of progress on measures of health care quality and value. The Alliance is a nonpartisan 501(c)(3) nonprofit with more than 185 member organizations. A cornerstone of the Alliance's work is the Community Checkup, a report to the public comparing the performance of medical groups, hospitals and health plans and offering a community-level view on important measures of health care quality (www.wacommunitycheckup.org).

One Response to “The Alliance Takes on the Wall Street Journal”

  1. Paul Buehrens MD

    Bravo, Nancy. You’re correct. Eastside Health Network is a grassroots provider network that also uses creative contracts with health plans to choose providers that cooperate with quality incentives, accept network committee provider initiatives, bring forward physician champions and collaborate to reduce waste, foster better referrals, and control quality and cost together. We encourage transparency of prices as a welcome addition.

    Paul Buehrens MD
    Clinical Advisor, EHN
    206-794-5755

    Reply
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